Neurotiming and Language Skills/Academic Performance

In a recent study, preschoolers who were able to match an experimenter’s steady beat on a conga drum were also found to have better language skills than non-synchronizers: they named objects faster, had better auditory memories, and scored more highly on tests of phonological awareness. Read the Full Article

Neuroscientists at Northwestern University have made a surprising link between music, rhythmic abilities and language skills.  People who have a better sense of rhythm and can move to a beat show more consistent brain responses to speech than those with less rhythm. Read the Full Article

A study published in ‘Psychology in the Schools’ shows that children who completed 4 weeks of rhythm and timing training performed better on reading tests compared to those who did not receive training. Read the Full Article

Research shows that hand-clapping songs improve motor and cognitive skills in children and young adults. Read the Full Article

 

Neurotiming and Athleticism/Coordination

Study showing that synchronized metronome training induces changes in kinematic properties of the golf swing. Read the Full Article

This study looked at the brain under fMRI while listening to rhythmic auditory sounds.  Bengtsson et al (2009) found that areas of the brain involved in motor planning and sequencing (or preparing motor sequences) were activated while listening to rhythmic sound.

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In this study by Jantzen et al. (2007), the authors identified that timing in the brain for motor coordination relies upon a “network of brain areas engaged to meet the specific sensory, motor and cognitive demands of the associated coordination behavior.”  While looking at the brain under fMRI during synchronous movement they were able to tease out regions of the brain involved in interval timing for motor activity and to show that information about timing from the environment (or context) influences internal timing for coordinated movement. Read the Full Article

Neurotiming and Executive Function

This study shows that differences between individuals in timing in the brain largely determine how quickly a person can process information and respond to it and that this ultimately determines their level of intelligence (or IQ).  The faster the processing, the higher the intelligence. Read the Full Article

This study in Journal of Neuroscience shows coordination of neuronal activity in the millisecond range, within and between brain regions, is essential for a broad range of cognitive functions, such as working memory, perceptual binding and awareness, and attention.”  In this particular study, they provide further evidence that the timing of neural signals between & within areas of the brain is the basic foundation of intelligence.  Read the Full Article

Hembold and colleagues (2007) proved that there is a very strong relationship between higher intelligence (better performance on cognitive and motor tasks) and the ability to rapidly process information (or think fast).  They found that timing in the brain was significantly related to several factors that determine intelligence: speed, capacity, and memory. Read the Full Article

This study looked at the brain under fMRI while listening to rhythmic auditory sounds.  Bengtsson et al (2009) found that areas of the brain involved in motor planning and sequencing (or preparing motor sequences) were activated while listening to rhythmic sound.  Read the Full Article

Neurotiming and Memory

This study shows a clear relationship between working memory and timing in the brain (Fortin et al., 2007).  Essentially, if timing in the brain is disrupted, then working memory does not work very efficiently or effectively leading to a host of problems at home, school, work, and play. Read the Full Article

Interesting study on memory and timing in the brain by Botzung et al (2008).  Timing in the brain (or what scientists refer to as precisely timed neural transmissions or neural oscillations in and between brain regions) is critical for humans to be able to store and retrieve memories. Read the Full Article

The rate & synchronization of timing in the brain have a great influence on our ability to control our attention, direct it where it needs to be, tune out distractions, maintain and update information about what we are supposed to be doing “right now” in working memory (“inhibition”), and, of course, make all this happen seamlessly without hiccups. In this study, researchers provided further evidence that working memory is central to our ability to function in the world and that it is greatly affected by how well we can direct the focus of our attention. Read the Full Article